MRI

Football Season And The Dangers Of Head Injuries

Who doesn’t love football season? Whether it’s college football or the NFL, football season is the time to ignite rivalries and join a fantasy football team. Unfortunately, football injuries can ruin a team’s chances for a winning season and have lifelong effects on the athlete.

MRI Scans Explained: Duration, Radiation Exposure, & More

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MRI’s are a noninvasive way for your doctor to examine your organs, tissues and skeletal system. They produce high-resolution images of the inside of the body that help diagnose a variety of problems. Below, we’ll answer all of your MRI questions, including “what is an MRI”, “how long does an MRI take”, “how much does an MRI cost”, and more. 

What is an MRI?

Magnetic resonance imaging—or MRI—is an imaging technique that uses a large magnet and radio waves to create detailed images of the body. The scan uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to generate images of parts of the body that can't be seen as well with other imaging modalities including X-rays, CT scans or ultrasound. The MRI machine can also be used to produce 3-D images that may be viewed from many different angles. 

How does an MRI work?

Electromagnetic energy is released when exposing a patient to radio waves in a strong magnetic field, which is then measured and analyzed by a computer producing two and three-dimensional images. The MRI scanner creates a strong magnetic field through the body, and then it sends radio waves into the body and assesses the response sent back from the different tissues. 

How long does an MRI take?

Depending on the type of scan you are having, and the location of the area being scanned, your MRI can take anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour to complete.

What happens during an MRI?

An MRI procedure is totally painless. You must remove all metal from your body, including keys, hair pins, fingernail clippers, zippers, watches, and remove any piercings,  before lying down on a movable table that slides into the opening of the tube-shaped MRI machine. Since the MRI uses magnets, it can be very dangerous for the patient or technologist if metal enters the room so you may be asked to change into a gown or approved clothing.

A radiologic technologist runs the machine and monitors you from another room, where they can speak to you through a microphone. If you are claustrophobic, you may be offered headphones to listen to music, goggles to view images or shows, and you can request low dose sedative medicine from your physician to help you calm down.

Will I be exposed to radiation during my MRI?

There is no MRI scan radiation because MRI uses magnets rather than ionizing radiation like X-rays or CT scans.

How much does an MRI cost?

The cost of your MRI will differ based on your location and the type of scan performed, as well as whether or not you have insurance; however, generally, MRIs are more expensive than x-rays or CT scans. The average cost of an MRI without insurance in the United States is around $2,500. Please ask your MRI facility for self pay rates if you are uninsured.  

If you are looking to book an MRI in San Francisco with board-certified radiologists at a leading imaging center, find your closest BICRAD location and make an appointment today!


What Is Radiology?

Even if you didn’t realize it, you’ve probably benefited from the field of radiology at some point during your life. Radiology includes a variety of imaging services used for diagnostic and treatment purposes, ranging from simple x-rays to more complicated interventional radiology procedures. Still, you might not be aware of all that the field of radiology encompasses. Below, we’ll discuss the ins and outs of radiology including what it is, what a radiologist does, and some of the most common procedures found in the field of radiology.

How Breast Density Determines The Best Breast Screening Test

At Bay Imaging Consultants, we stress the importance of regular mammograms and breast screenings. While mammograms are the standard for breast imaging, factors may play a role into whether or not additional imaging tests are needed.  Breast MRI and ultrasound are often suggested for women at risk of breast cancer, which includes women with high breast density. Here’s a closer look at how breast density affects which screening test is best for you.

5 Reasons Why A CalBears Athlete May Need An Imaging Test

As sponsors for CalAthletics, we understand the endurance required to be a student-athlete. Injuries are a part of the game, but they can also affect an athlete’s season and career when they happen. Fortunately, radiology can be used to diagnose these injuries while effectively treating them for faster recoveries and less time off for athletes. Here are a few common injuries that may require a CalBear athlete to undergo an imaging test.

Fall In Love With MRI Through Cinemavision

MRI’s are an important imaging test that can be used for diagnostic purposes, but this scan can trigger scanxiety in patients. Whether it’s your first time or you suffer from claustrophobia, MRI’s can be intimidating. At Bay Imaging Consultants, patient comfort is our biggest priority when performing any medical test. To ensure our patients have the best imaging experience, we now offer Cinemavision to patients undergoing MRI procedures.

Screening Tests Used For Diagnosing Prostate Cancer

As the second most common cancer in men, prostate cancer awareness is important. While this cancer is common in men, it’s usually successfully treated when detected early. Prostate screenings and biopsies are vital when diagnosing prostate cancer and monitoring treatment for diagnosed cases.  Since symptoms can be undetectable until later stages, knowing about what tests are available is the important first step to fighting prostate cancer.

What You’ll Need To Know About Contrast Agents

After being recommended a diagnostic imaging scan, you may start to research more about these scans. From MRI's to CT scan, these procedures are often simpler and a lot less scary than they may initially seem. When doing your research about a particular scan, you may discover that a certain scan uses contrast agents.